D.Horton: “I Want to be Revered as the Shakespeare of Hip Hop” Part 2

Photo Credit: Hank Washington; Instagram: iam_hank

 

ADVISORY: This audio contains explicit language

 

Music Credits:

“Soul Food” – D.Horton; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 2

“Doin’ Something Right” – D.Horton; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 2

“The Friendly City” – D. Horton; produced by KTGotBeats and New1Message; The Sessions 2

“Black Butterfly” – D.Horton; produced by New1Message; The Sessions 2

“Lose Control” – D.Horton ft. Josias; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 3p: pt. 3

“I of God” – D.Horton; produced by New1Message; The Sessions 3: pt. 1

“Pocket Science” – D.Horton; produced by Joe Dent (3Seaven); The Sessions 3: pt. 2

“Mirror 2x” – D.Horton; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 3p: pt. 3

“The God Particle” – D.Horton; produced by KTGotBeats

For more of D.Horton’s music and “I am brilliant” tees, go to  http://davetherapper.com

D.Horton: “I Want to be Revered as the Shakespeare of Hip Hop” Part 1

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Photo Credits: Rey Leubh; Instagram: rey_leubh

 

ADVISORY: This audio contains explicit language

 

Music Credits:

“Still in the House” – D. Horton; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 2

“Hughes Road” – D.Horton; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 3P: Pt. 3

“Homecoming” – D. Horton; produced by Professor X; Brilliant Minds

“Yeah 2x” – D.Horton; produced by New1Message!; The Sessions 3: Pt. 1

“Believe” – D. Horton; produced by KTGotBeats; The Sessions 

“Father’s Day” – D.Horton; produced by Joe Dent (3Seaven); The Sessions 2

For more of D.Horton’s music and “I am brilliant” tees, go to  http://davetherapper.com

The Intertextuality of Hip Hop and Sport Part II

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Photo Credit: gawker.com

In a time of social despair, the release of the “Straight Outta Compton” film continues to act as a pivotal element in re-inspiring multiple generations of people across the world. Although the timely film brought back some unsettled memories for a few people (get the story behind the film here: https://byoungncompany.com/inspiration/), it positively recollects how “the world’s most dangerous group” made Los Angeles professional sports apparel a popular trend within Hip Hop and many other cultures.

In the 2010 ESPN 30 for 30 “Straight Outta L.A.,” former NWA member Ice Cube talks about how LA Hip Hop changed the rules of the rap game in the same way the LA Raiders changed the rules of football. During the Raiders’ 13 years in LA, the team was known for being  the ruthless “bad boys” of football and NWA identified with that same ruthless, bad boy attitude in rap, which is why group members were frequently seen sporting black or wearing Raider gear. It was all  a part of their identity. Continue reading “The Intertextuality of Hip Hop and Sport Part II”

The Intertextuality of Hip Hop and Sport

   It seems that every athlete wants to be a rapper and ever rapper wants to be an athlete, at least this is the case for African American males. Athletes such as Ron Artest, Shaquille O’Neal, Allen Iverson, Kobe Bryant and others have tried to rap, and many rappers have played sports and decided it wasn’t for them (Shaq was actually a decent rapper). On the other hand, rappers such as 2-Chains, Roscoe Dash and others have had a short stint on the hardwood. I always wondered why this is the case? Maybe the rappers were undersized – most rappers are short – and maybe athletes’ word plays weren’t strong enough. One thing that’s for sure is that you can always catch rappers at sporting events and athletes at a hip-hop concert. Even in the film “Brown Sugar,” Boris Kodjoe’s character is an NBA player who is an aspiring rapper. In his song “January 28th,” J. Cole says  “I turn the TV on, not one hero in sight, unless he dribble or he fiddle with mics.” I think the commonality between the African American males that rap and play basketball, or even football, is their economic statuses. Continue reading “The Intertextuality of Hip Hop and Sport”